Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Lambin, E. F.
dc.contributor.author Gibbs, H. K.
dc.contributor.author Ferreira, L.
dc.contributor.author Grau, Hector Ricardo
dc.contributor.author Mayaux, P.
dc.contributor.author Meyfroidt, P.
dc.contributor.author Morton, D. C.
dc.contributor.author Rudel, T. K.
dc.contributor.author Gasparri, Nestor Ignacio
dc.contributor.author Munger, J.
dc.date.available 2016-08-16T15:39:09Z
dc.date.issued 2013-10
dc.identifier.citation Lambin, E. F.; Gibbs, H. K.; Ferreira, L.; Grau, Hector Ricardo; Mayaux, P.; et al.; Estimating the world's potentially available cropland using a bottom-up approach; Elsevier; Global Environmental Change; 23; 5; 10-2013; 892-901
dc.identifier.issn 0959-3780
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11336/7169
dc.description.abstract Previous estimates of the land area available for future cropland expansion relied on global-scale climate, soil and terrain data. They did not include a range of constraints and tradeoffs associated with land conversion. As a result, estimates of the global land reserve have been high. Here we adjust these estimates for the aforementioned constraints and tradeoffs. We define potentially available cropland as the moderately to highly productive land that could be used in the coming years for rainfed farming, with low to moderate capital investments, and that is not under intact mature forests, legally protected, or already intensively managed. This productive land is underutilized rather than unused as it has ecological or social functions. We also define potentially available cropland that accounts for trade-offs between gains in agricultural production and losses in ecosystem and social services from intensified agriculture, to include only the potentially available cropland that would entail low ecological and social costs with conversion to cropland. In contrast to previous studies, we adopt a “bottom-up” approach by analyzing detailed, fine scale observations with expert knowledge for six countries or regions that are often assumed to include most of potentially available cropland. We conclude first that there is substantially less potential additional cropland than is generally assumed once constraints and trade offs are taken into account, and secondly that converting land is always associated with significant social and ecological costs. Future expansion of agricultural production will encounter a complex landscape of competing demands and tradeoffs.
dc.format application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Elsevier
dc.rights info:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccess
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/ar/
dc.subject agro-ecologycal zone
dc.subject land reserve
dc.subject land use
dc.subject land change
dc.subject agriculture
dc.subject food security
dc.subject degraded land
dc.subject.classification Geografía Física
dc.subject.classification Ciencias de la Tierra y relacionadas con el Medio Ambiente
dc.subject.classification CIENCIAS NATURALES Y EXACTAS
dc.subject.classification Agricultura
dc.subject.classification Agricultura, Silvicultura y Pesca
dc.subject.classification CIENCIAS AGRÍCOLAS
dc.title Estimating the world's potentially available cropland using a bottom-up approach
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.type info:ar-repo/semantics/artículo
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
dc.date.updated 2016-08-11T19:36:02Z
dc.journal.volume 23
dc.journal.number 5
dc.journal.pagination 892-901
dc.journal.pais Países Bajos
dc.journal.ciudad Amsterdam
dc.description.fil Fil: Lambin, E. F.. Université Catholique de Louvain. Earth and Life Institute. Georges Lemaître Centre for Earth and Climate Research; Bélgica. University Of Stanford; Estados Unidos
dc.description.fil Fil: Gibbs, H. K.. University Of Wisconsin; Estados Unidos
dc.description.fil Fil: Ferreira, L.. Universidade Federal de Goias; Brasil
dc.description.fil Fil: Grau, Hector Ricardo. Universidad Nacional de Tucumán. Facultad de Ciencias Naturales e Instituto Miguel Lillo. Instituto de Ecología Regional; Argentina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Centro Científico Tecnológico Tucumán; Argentina
dc.description.fil Fil: Mayaux, P.. European Commission. Joint Research Centre. Institute for Environment and Sustainability; Italia
dc.description.fil Fil: Meyfroidt, P. . Université Catholique de Louvain. Earth and Life Institute. Georges Lemaître Centre for Earth and Climate Research; Bélgica. F.R.S-FNRS; Bélgica
dc.description.fil Fil: Morton, D. C.. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; Estados Unidos
dc.description.fil Fil: Rudel, T. K.. Rutgers University. Departments of Human Ecology and Sociology; Estados Unidos
dc.description.fil Fil: Gasparri, Nestor Ignacio. Universidad Nacional de Tucumán. Facultad de Ciencias Naturales e Instituto Miguel Lillo. Instituto de Ecología Regional; Argentina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Centro Científico Tecnológico Tucumán; Argentina
dc.description.fil Fil: Munger, J. . University Of Wisconsin; Estados Unidos
dc.journal.title Global Environmental Change
dc.relation.alternativeid info:eu-repo/semantics/altIdentifier/url/http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959378013000794
dc.relation.alternativeid info:eu-repo/semantics/altIdentifier/doi/10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2013.05.005
dc.relation.alternativeid info:eu-repo/semantics/altIdentifier/doi/http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2013.05.005


Archivos asociados

Icon
Blocked Acceso no disponible

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

info:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccess Excepto donde se diga explícitamente, este item se publica bajo la siguiente descripción: Atribución-NoComercial-SinDerivadas 2.5 Argentina (CC BY-NC-ND 2.5 AR)