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dc.contributor.author Pirk, Gabriela Inés
dc.contributor.author Farji Brener, Alejandro Gustavo
dc.date.available 2016-07-22T20:38:26Z
dc.date.issued 2013-08
dc.identifier.citation Pirk, Gabriela Inés; Farji Brener, Alejandro Gustavo; Can the nutrient-rich soil patches created by leaf-cutting ants favor plant compensation for foliar damage? A test of the compensatory continuum hypothesis; Springer; Plant Ecology; 214; 8; 8-2013; 1059-1070
dc.identifier.issn 1385-0237
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11336/6665
dc.description.abstract Compensation, the degree of plant recovery after herbivory, is influenced by nutrient availability. The compensatory continuum hypothesis (CCH) predicts that the more abundant the resources in an environment, the greater the potential for compensation. Nutrient-rich patches generated by leaf-cutting ants near their nests could modify plants’ responses to damage. We performed a greenhouse and a field experiment to evaluate the effects of refuse dumps (RDs) created by Acromyrmex lobicornis on plant compensation for foliar herbivory in roadside areas of the Patagonian steppe. We expected higher tolerance in plants growing in RDs than in adjacent non-nest soils (NNSs). We also assessed whether compensation differed between native and exotic species common in the area. We expected higher compensation in exotic than native plants since they perform better in RDs. Native and exotic plants fully compensated for simulated herbivory resembling natural levels. In the greenhouse, clipped plants achieved similar biomass as control plants and in the field reproductive output was similar between treatments. However, compensation was not higher in RDs than NNSs or in exotic than native plants as expected. Both native and exotic plants in roadside areas may have traits associated with disturbance which allow them to tolerate natural occurring herbivory without compromising their performance. Our study, the first one to test the CCH on RDs, shows that enhanced levels of resources do not always determine higher tolerance to herbivory.
dc.format application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Springer
dc.rights info:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccess
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/ar/
dc.subject Acromyrmex lobicornis
dc.subject Disturbance
dc.subject Herbivory
dc.subject.classification Ecología
dc.subject.classification Ciencias Biológicas
dc.subject.classification CIENCIAS NATURALES Y EXACTAS
dc.title Can the nutrient-rich soil patches created by leaf-cutting ants favor plant compensation for foliar damage? A test of the compensatory continuum hypothesis
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.type info:ar-repo/semantics/artículo
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
dc.date.updated 2016-07-22T18:52:24Z
dc.journal.volume 214
dc.journal.number 8
dc.journal.pagination 1059-1070
dc.journal.pais Alemania
dc.journal.ciudad Berlin
dc.description.fil Fil: Pirk, Gabriela Inés. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Centro Científico Tecnológico Patagonia Norte. Instituto de Investigación en Biodiversidad y Medioambiente; Argentina
dc.description.fil Fil: Farji Brener, Alejandro Gustavo. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Centro Científico Tecnológico Patagonia Norte. Instituto de Investigación en Biodiversidad y Medioambiente; Argentina
dc.journal.title Plant Ecology
dc.relation.alternativeid info:eu-repo/semantics/altIdentifier/url/http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11258-013-0231-9
dc.relation.alternativeid info:eu-repo/semantics/altIdentifier/doi/http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11258-013-0231-9
dc.relation.alternativeid info:eu-repo/semantics/altIdentifier/doi/10.1007/s11258-013-0231-9


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info:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccess Excepto donde se diga explícitamente, este item se publica bajo la siguiente descripción: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 Unported (CC BY-NC-SA 2.5)