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dc.contributor.author
Lopez, Javier Alejandro
dc.contributor.author
Scarabotti, Pablo Augusto
dc.contributor.author
Ghirardi, Romina
dc.date.available
2018-09-17T15:24:59Z
dc.date.issued
2015-12
dc.identifier.citation
Lopez, Javier Alejandro; Scarabotti, Pablo Augusto; Ghirardi, Romina; Amphibian trophic ecology in increasingly human-altered wetlands; US Geological Survey; Herpetological Conservation and Biology; 10; 3; 12-2015; 819-832
dc.identifier.issn
1931-7603
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/11336/59860
dc.description.abstract
Habitat destruction and alteration are among the major causes of worldwide amphibian declines. Resource limitation in altered environments can potentially affect trophic ecology of amphibians and contribute to decline. In this work, we analyzed changes in resource availability and use, and the population abundance of eight amphibian species from six wetlands that differ in type and degree of human disturbance. Food resource availability varied among sites and the occurrence of some arthropods was correlated with type of disturbance regime. Diet evenness, richness, and niche breadth were similar among sites or months. Nevertheless, diet composition showed significant variation among samples for all species. Diet composition changes among populations were correlated with resource availability in four species (Lysapsus limellum, Dendropsophus nanus, Hypsiboas pulchellus and H. punctatus), but not in the remaining species (D. sanborni, H. raniceps, Scinax nasicus and S. squalirostris). These results suggest that species that are able to adjust their diets according to prey availability may have an adaptive advantage in changing environments associated with anthropogenic disturbances. Given the increasing rate of alteration of wetlands by urbanization, agriculture, and livestock grazing, understanding trophic processes in these habitats is important for preserving the great biodiversity living in these habitats.
dc.format
application/pdf
dc.language.iso
eng
dc.publisher
US Geological Survey
dc.rights
info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.rights.uri
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/ar/
dc.subject
Flood Plain Ponds
dc.subject
Habitat Alteration
dc.subject
Hylidae
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Prey Availability
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Trophic Plasticity
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Otras Ciencias Biológicas
dc.subject.classification
Ciencias Biológicas
dc.subject.classification
CIENCIAS NATURALES Y EXACTAS
dc.title
Amphibian trophic ecology in increasingly human-altered wetlands
dc.type
info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.type
info:ar-repo/semantics/artículo
dc.type
info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
dc.date.updated
2018-09-14T13:23:25Z
dc.journal.volume
10
dc.journal.number
3
dc.journal.pagination
819-832
dc.journal.pais
Estados Unidos
dc.description.fil
Fil: Lopez, Javier Alejandro. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Centro Científico Tecnológico Conicet - Santa Fe. Instituto Nacional de Limnología. Universidad Nacional del Litoral. Instituto Nacional de Limnología; Argentina
dc.description.fil
Fil: Scarabotti, Pablo Augusto. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Centro Científico Tecnológico Conicet - Santa Fe. Instituto Nacional de Limnología. Universidad Nacional del Litoral. Instituto Nacional de Limnología; Argentina
dc.description.fil
Fil: Ghirardi, Romina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Centro Científico Tecnológico Conicet - Santa Fe. Instituto Nacional de Limnología. Universidad Nacional del Litoral. Instituto Nacional de Limnología; Argentina
dc.journal.title
Herpetological Conservation and Biology
dc.relation.alternativeid
info:eu-repo/semantics/altIdentifier/url/http://herpconbio.org/volumes.html


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