Mostrar el registro sencillo del ítem

dc.contributor.author
Ortega Insurralde, Isabel
dc.contributor.author
Toloza, Ariel Ceferino
dc.contributor.author
Gonzalez Audino, Paola Andrea
dc.contributor.author
Picollo, Maria Ines
dc.date.available
2018-05-04T19:34:09Z
dc.date.issued
2016-12
dc.identifier.citation
Ortega Insurralde, Isabel; Toloza, Ariel Ceferino; Gonzalez Audino, Paola Andrea; Picollo, Maria Ines; Arrestant Effect of Human Scalp Compounds on Pediculus humanus capitis. Journal Medical Entomology; Entomological Society of America; Journal of Medical Entomology; 12-2016
dc.identifier.issn
0022-2585
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/11336/44216
dc.description.abstract
Relevant evidence has shown that parasites process host-related information using chemical, visual, tactile, or auditory cues. However, the cues that are involved in the host–parasite interaction between Pediculus humanus capitis (De Geer 1767) and humans have not been identified yet. In this work, we studied the effect of human scalp components on the behavior of adult head lice. Filter paper segments were rubbed on volunteers’ scalps and then placed in the experimental arena, where adult head lice were individually tested. The movement of the insects was recorded for each arena using the software EthoVision. Average movement parameters were calculated for the treatments in the bioassays such as total distance, velocity, number of times a head louse crossed between zones of the arena, and time in each zone of the arena. We found that scalp components induced head lice to decrease average locomotor activity and to remain arrested on the treated paper. The effect of the ageing of human scalp samples in the response of head lice was not statistically significant (i.e., human scalp samples of 4, 18, 40, and 60 h of ageing did not elicit a significant change in head louse behavior). When we analyzed the effect of the sex in the response of head lice to human scalp samples, males demonstrated significant differences. Our results showed for the first time the effect of host components conditioning head lice behavior. We discuss the role of these components in the dynamic of head lice infestation.
dc.format
application/pdf
dc.language.iso
eng
dc.publisher
Entomological Society of America
dc.rights
info:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccess
dc.rights.uri
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/ar/
dc.subject
Arrestant
dc.subject
Human Scalp
dc.subject
Headlice
dc.subject.classification
Otras Ciencias Biológicas
dc.subject.classification
Ciencias Biológicas
dc.subject.classification
CIENCIAS NATURALES Y EXACTAS
dc.title
Arrestant Effect of Human Scalp Compounds on Pediculus humanus capitis. Journal Medical Entomology
dc.type
info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.type
info:ar-repo/semantics/artículo
dc.type
info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
dc.date.updated
2018-05-04T14:56:00Z
dc.journal.pais
Estados Unidos
dc.journal.ciudad
Lanham
dc.description.fil
Fil: Ortega Insurralde, Isabel. Ministerio de Defensa. Instituto de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas para la Defensa; Argentina
dc.description.fil
Fil: Toloza, Ariel Ceferino. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas; Argentina. Ministerio de Defensa. Instituto de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas para la Defensa; Argentina
dc.description.fil
Fil: Gonzalez Audino, Paola Andrea. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas; Argentina. Ministerio de Defensa. Instituto de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas para la Defensa; Argentina
dc.description.fil
Fil: Picollo, Maria Ines. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas; Argentina. Ministerio de Defensa. Instituto de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas para la Defensa; Argentina
dc.journal.title
Journal of Medical Entomology
dc.relation.alternativeid
info:eu-repo/semantics/altIdentifier/doi/http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jme/tjw192
dc.relation.alternativeid
info:eu-repo/semantics/altIdentifier/url/https://academic.oup.com/jme/article-abstract/54/2/258/2952748