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dc.contributor.author Longo, Maria Grisel
dc.contributor.author Seidler, Tristram G.
dc.contributor.author Garibaldi, Lucas Alejandro
dc.contributor.author Tognetti, Pedro Maximiliano
dc.contributor.author Chaneton, Enrique Jose
dc.date.available 2016-02-17T21:06:19Z
dc.date.issued 2013-09
dc.identifier.citation Longo, Maria Grisel; Seidler, Tristram G.; Garibaldi, Lucas Alejandro; Tognetti, Pedro Maximiliano; Chaneton, Enrique Jose; Functional group dominance and identity effects influence the magnitude of grassland invasion; Wiley; Journal of Ecology; 101; 5; 9-2013; 1114-1124
dc.identifier.issn 0022-0477
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11336/4258
dc.description.abstract Variation in functional community composition is expected to influence the extent of exotic species invasions. Yet, whether resident functional groups control invasion through their relative biomass (mass ratio hypothesis) or by traits other than biomass (identity hypothesis) remains poorly understood. We performed a 6-year experiment to determine the effects of removing different functional groups on exotic species biomass in a Flooding Pampa grassland, Argentina. Functional groups were defined by life-form (grasses or forbs), phenology (winter or summer) and origin (native or exotic). Removal of each functional group was compared against the removal of an equivalent amount of random biomass. Exotic group responses were monitored over 4 years of continuous removals, and after 2 years of recovery without manipulations. Removal of dominant native summer grasses caused the greatest impact on exotic species and overall community composition. Native summer-grass removal significantly increased exotic grass (120%) and forb (730%) biomass beyond the level (46% and 180%, respectively) expected from deleting a similar amount of biomass at random. Exotic annual grasses showed only a transient increase, whereas exotic forb invasion persisted even after 2 years without removals. Removing subordinate, native or exotic winter grasses, and rare native forbs significantly promoted exotic forbs, but to the same level (300%) as random biomass removals. Total grass removal increased exotic forbs to half the extent expected from adding the effects of single grass group removals. Dispersal limitation and harsh abiotic conditions may constrain exotic forb spread into such heavily grass-depleted patches. Synthesis. The impact of losing a functional group on the magnitude and persistence of invasion reflected its relative contribution to community biomass. Identity attributes other than biomass (e.g. phenological niche) further enhanced the biotic control that dominant native grasses exerted on established exotic species. Our findings highlight the community legacies of past disturbances to dominant functional groups.
dc.format application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Wiley
dc.rights info:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccess
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/ar/
dc.subject BIODIVERSITY
dc.subject BIOTIC RESISTANCE
dc.subject INVASION ECOLOGY
dc.subject MASS RATIO HYPOTHESIS
dc.subject PHENOLOGICAL NICHES
dc.subject RANK ABUNDANCE
dc.subject REMOVAL EXPERIMENT
dc.subject SUB-ADDITIVE EFFECT
dc.subject.classification Conservación de la Biodiversidad
dc.subject.classification Ciencias Biológicas
dc.subject.classification CIENCIAS NATURALES Y EXACTAS
dc.subject.classification Ecología
dc.subject.classification Ciencias Biológicas
dc.subject.classification CIENCIAS NATURALES Y EXACTAS
dc.subject.classification Agronomía, reproducción y protección de plantas
dc.subject.classification Agricultura, Silvicultura y Pesca
dc.subject.classification CIENCIAS AGRÍCOLAS
dc.title Functional group dominance and identity effects influence the magnitude of grassland invasion
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.type info:ar-repo/semantics/artículo
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
dc.date.updated 2016-03-30 10:35:44.97925-03
dc.journal.volume 101
dc.journal.number 5
dc.journal.pagination 1114-1124
dc.journal.pais Estados Unidos
dc.journal.ciudad Hoboken
dc.description.fil Fil: Longo, Maria Grisel. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Oficina de Coordinación Administrativa Parque Centenario. Instituto de Investigaciones Fisiológicas y Ecológicas Vinculadas A la Agricultura; Argentina
dc.description.fil Fil: Seidler, Tristram G.. Harvard University; Estados Unidos
dc.description.fil Fil: Garibaldi, Lucas Alejandro. Universidad Nacional de Rio Negro. Sede Andina; Argentina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas; Argentina
dc.description.fil Fil: Tognetti, Pedro Maximiliano. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Oficina de Coordinación Administrativa Parque Centenario. Instituto de Investigaciones Fisiológicas y Ecológicas Vinculadas a la Agricultura; Argentina
dc.description.fil Fil: Chaneton, Enrique Jose. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Oficina de Coordinación Administrativa Parque Centenario. Instituto de Investigaciones Fisiológicas y Ecológicas Vinculadas A la Agricultura; Argentina. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Agronomía. Departamento de Métodos Cuantitativos y Sistemas de Información; Argentina
dc.journal.title Journal of Ecology
dc.relation.alternativeid info:eu-repo/semantics/altIdentifier/url/http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1365-2745.12128/abstract
dc.relation.alternativeid info:eu-repo/semantics/altIdentifier/doi/http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1365-2745.12128
dc.relation.alternativeid info:eu-repo/semantics/altIdentifier/issn/0022-0477


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info:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccess Excepto donde se diga explícitamente, este item se publica bajo la siguiente descripción: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 Unported (CC BY-NC-SA 2.5)