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dc.contributor.author Connor, David J.
dc.contributor.author Gómez del Campo, Maria
dc.contributor.author Rousseaux, Maria Cecilia
dc.contributor.author Searles, Peter Stoughton
dc.date.available 2017-01-27T20:20:21Z
dc.date.issued 2014-04
dc.identifier.citation Connor, David J.; Gómez del Campo, Maria; Rousseaux, Maria Cecilia; Searles, Peter Stoughton; Structure, Management and Productivity of Hedgerow Olive Orchards: A Review; Elsevier Science; Scientia Horticulturae; 169; 4-2014; 71-93
dc.identifier.issn 0304-4238
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11336/12104
dc.description.abstract Olive was introduced into cultivation more than 3000 years ago, but only during the last two decades has cultivation shifted from low density to dense hedgerow orchards. This development responds to the need for mechanization to reduce production costs and achieve more timely management interventions. There is, however, little scientific or commercial knowledge available to support this new planting system in olive and to contribute to its development. This review focuses on what is known and what knowledge is required for design and management of hedgerow orchards for continuing productivity and economic viability. The review adopts a targeted approach based on consideration of the impact of orchard structure on microenvironment and production processes and oil quality. Particular emphasis is given to how orchard design and structure affect irradiance interception and how that determines productivity. The review also deals with establishment of orchards (cultivar selection, planting patterns, pruning for row formation) and maintenance of hedgerows for continuing productivity (irrigation, fertilization, pruning to maintain structure and productivity, control of pests and diseases, and regeneration of failed hedgerows). An important underlying consideration is the strong interaction between design and dimensions of both hedgerows and harvesting machines with examples taken from the two common, high density (HD) and super-high density (SHD) orchard designs. The search for new machine designs continues simultaneously with that for cultivars, orchard layouts, and pruning systems better suited to this new production system. Currently, only three cultivars (‘Arbequina’, ‘Arbosana, ‘Koroneiki’) dominate SHD orchards. Over-row harvesters must match hedgerow dimensions while tree structure and fruiting behavior must suit the harvester. Context is provided by identifying reasons for major differences from traditional olive culture and attitudes from which most existing information on tree response and successful management practice has been accumulated. To account for these differences, terminology is proposed to define hedgerow structure that is required for effective management of oil production, oil quality, sanitary conditions, and profitability under various conditions. The review continues with discussions of requirements and current performance of mechanical harvesters and a comparative lifecycle economic analysis of alternative HD and SHD systems. The latter demonstrates the complexity of analysis and its importance to the choice of orchard design at the outset of each new project. The review concludes with recommendations for basic and applied research to determine optimal hedgerow structures and management for individual situations, development of new cultivars, and maintenance of hedgerow structure for continuing productivity.
dc.format application/pdf
dc.language.iso eng
dc.publisher Elsevier Science
dc.rights info:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccess
dc.rights.uri https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/ar/
dc.subject CULTIVAR
dc.subject HARVESTERS
dc.subject MICROCLIMATE
dc.subject OLEA EUROPAEA L
dc.subject ORCHARD DESIGN
dc.subject ORCHARD ESTABLISHMENT
dc.subject ORCHARD MAINTAINANCE
dc.subject.classification Horticultura, Viticultura
dc.subject.classification Agricultura, Silvicultura y Pesca
dc.subject.classification CIENCIAS AGRÍCOLAS
dc.title Structure, Management and Productivity of Hedgerow Olive Orchards: A Review
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.type info:ar-repo/semantics/artículo
dc.type info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
dc.date.updated 2017-01-27T13:28:43Z
dc.journal.volume 169
dc.journal.pagination 71-93
dc.journal.pais Países Bajos
dc.journal.ciudad Ámsterdam
dc.description.fil Fil: Connor, David J.. The University Of Melbourne; Australia
dc.description.fil Fil: Gómez del Campo, Maria. Universidad Politécnica de Madrid. Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros Agrónomos de Madrid; España
dc.description.fil Fil: Rousseaux, Maria Cecilia. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Centro Regional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Transferencia Tecnológica de Anillaco; Argentina
dc.description.fil Fil: Searles, Peter Stoughton. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Centro Regional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Transferencia Tecnológica de Anillaco; Argentina
dc.journal.title Scientia Horticulturae
dc.relation.alternativeid info:eu-repo/semantics/altIdentifier/url/http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304423814000831
dc.relation.alternativeid info:eu-repo/semantics/altIdentifier/doi/http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scienta.2014.02.010


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    Articulos de CENTRO REGIONAL DE INV. CIENTIFICAS Y TRANSFERENCIA TECNOLOGICA DE ANILLACO

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info:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccess Excepto donde se diga explícitamente, este item se publica bajo la siguiente descripción: Atribución-NoComercial-SinDerivadas 2.5 Argentina (CC BY-NC-ND 2.5 AR)