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dc.contributor.author
Cavalli, Camila María  
dc.contributor.author
Carballo Pozzo Ardizzi, Fabricio  
dc.contributor.author
Dzik, Marina Victoria  
dc.contributor.author
Underwood, Susana  
dc.contributor.author
Bentosela, Mariana  
dc.date.available
2018-06-04T20:00:31Z  
dc.date.issued
2018-01  
dc.identifier.citation
Cavalli, Camila María; Carballo Pozzo Ardizzi, Fabricio; Dzik, Marina Victoria; Underwood, Susana; Bentosela, Mariana; Are animal-assisted activity dogs different from pet dogs? A comparison of their sociocognitive abilities; Elsevier Science Inc; Journal Of Veterinary Behavior-clinical Applications And Research; 23; 1-2018; 76-81  
dc.identifier.issn
1558-7878  
dc.identifier.uri
http://hdl.handle.net/11336/47214  
dc.description.abstract
Animal assisted activities (AAA) refer to a variety of interactions between animals and humans, intended to improve people?s wellbeing providing recreational or educational opportunities. Domestic dogs are one of the most commonly used animals for these kinds of interventions, given their trainability and the positive effects of dog-human interactions. Nevertheless, the selection of participating animals is mainly unsystematic and training is not required for dogs to take part in AAA. Previous studies suggest that high sociability as well as reduced fear and aggression are desirable traits in AAA dogs. Yet, to our knowledge, there are no previous studies assessing the specific characteristics of dogs participating in AAA. The aim of this study is to compare the performance of AAA and pet dogs that live in the same household but do not participate in AAA. We assessed 17 dogs (9 participating in AAA in hospital settings, and 8 pets living in the same household ? control group) with a test battery comprising three behavioral tasks (sociability test, gazing test, and A-not-B task), and owner rated questionnaires (Dog Impulsivity Assessment Scale, ?DIAS?, and 4 subscales: Trainability, Fear to Strangers, Nonsocial fear and Attachment/Attention seeking of the Canine Behavioral Assessment and Research Questionnaire, ?C-BARQ?). Results of the gazing test indicate that, when dogs were not reinforced for looking at the human face, AAA dogs gazed longer at an unknown experimenter than pet dogs. Therefore, they showed an increased tendency to gaze at humans and persist on this communicative attempt when this response was not successful. Additionally, according to the DIAS score, AAA dogs would be less impulsive than the control group. No significant differences were found on the A-not-B task, the sociability test or CBARQ questionnaire. In conclusion, since these AAA dogs had not undergone specific training, the effects observed in the present work may be attributed, at least partially, to the learning experiences they had during AAA work. Overall, it would be important to take into account these characteristics for both the selection and training of these animals.  
dc.format
application/pdf  
dc.language.iso
eng  
dc.publisher
Elsevier Science Inc  
dc.rights
info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess  
dc.rights.uri
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/ar/  
dc.subject
Animal  
dc.subject
Assisted  
dc.subject
Activities  
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Domestic  
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Dogs  
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Gazing  
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Test  
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Inhibitory  
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Control  
dc.subject.classification
Otras Ciencias Biológicas  
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Ciencias Biológicas  
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CIENCIAS NATURALES Y EXACTAS  
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Psicología  
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Psicología  
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CIENCIAS SOCIALES  
dc.title
Are animal-assisted activity dogs different from pet dogs? A comparison of their sociocognitive abilities  
dc.type
info:eu-repo/semantics/article  
dc.type
info:ar-repo/semantics/artículo  
dc.type
info:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion  
dc.date.updated
2018-06-04T17:18:41Z  
dc.journal.volume
23  
dc.journal.pagination
76-81  
dc.journal.pais
Estados Unidos  
dc.journal.ciudad
Nueva York  
dc.description.fil
Fil: Cavalli, Camila María. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Medicina. Instituto de Investigaciones Médicas; Argentina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Oficina de Coordinación Administrativa Houssay. Instituto de Investigaciones Médicas. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Medicina. Instituto de Investigaciones Médicas; Argentina  
dc.description.fil
Fil: Carballo Pozzo Ardizzi, Fabricio. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Centro Científico Tecnológico Conicet - Bahía Blanca. Instituto de Ciencias Biológicas y Biomédicas del Sur. Universidad Nacional del Sur. Departamento de Biología, Bioquímica y Farmacia. Instituto de Ciencias Biológicas y Biomédicas del Sur; Argentina  
dc.description.fil
Fil: Dzik, Marina Victoria. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Medicina. Instituto de Investigaciones Médicas; Argentina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Oficina de Coordinación Administrativa Houssay. Instituto de Investigaciones Médicas. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Medicina. Instituto de Investigaciones Médicas; Argentina  
dc.description.fil
Fil: Underwood, Susana. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Ciencias Veterinarias; Argentina  
dc.description.fil
Fil: Bentosela, Mariana. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Medicina. Instituto de Investigaciones Médicas; Argentina. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Oficina de Coordinación Administrativa Houssay. Instituto de Investigaciones Médicas. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Medicina. Instituto de Investigaciones Médicas; Argentina  
dc.journal.title
Journal Of Veterinary Behavior-clinical Applications And Research  
dc.relation.alternativeid
info:eu-repo/semantics/altIdentifier/doi/https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jveb.2017.12.001  
dc.relation.alternativeid
info:eu-repo/semantics/altIdentifier/url/https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1558787817301508